POLICE DETAIN 20 MALAYSIANS SINCE 2016 OVER TERRORISM FINANCING

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — The Royal Malaysian Police (PDRM) has detained 20 Malaysians suspected of sponsoring militant or terrorist activities since last year, said principal assistant director of Counter Terrorism Division, Special Branch, Bukit Aman, Ayob Khan Mydin Pitchay.

He said the suspects, aged between 20 and 40 years, who operated alone, were believed to have been financing Daesh militant activities in small amounts to avoid from being detected by the authorities.

The funding was made in small amounts of between RM200 and RM2,000 using bank transactions.

Some of the suspects were prosecuted and detained under the Prevention of Crime Act 1959 (POCA) and Prevention of Terrorism Act 2015 (POTA), he told reporters when met at the the 3rd Counter Terrorism Financing Summit, here yesterday.

The police would continue to monitor the situation as more individuals were believed to have been involved in funding Daesh militants and terrorist activities.

Ayob Khan said the police also set eyes on non-profit organisations (NPOs) and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in the country to prevent terrorism financing.

We are monitoring NPO and NGO that try to channel funds and sympathise with the Daesh struggle after their downfall in Raqqa (Syria) and Mosul (Iraq).

He said although there were no such cases involving NPOs and NGOs, police always gather intelligence information so that the terrorist activities could be curbed.

Meanwhile, Ayob Khan said the militant group was now embarking on the ‘wolf pack’ approach where a group of up to six people would operate in isolation to avoid from being detected by the authorities.

The arrest of three suspects including a Form Six student in Pasir Puteh, Kelantan on Oct 10 for alleged involvement in terrorist activities was an example of the ‘wolf pack’ approach.

All of them were suspected of being involved in planning to carry out attacks at Better Beer Festival 2017, entertainment premises and places of worship in the Klang Valley, using man-made improvised explosive devices (IED).

Source: NAM NEWS NETWORK