MALAYSIA: MH370-LET OTHER PARTIES TO LEAD SEARCH – EXPERT

By Mohd Faizal Hassan

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia The next-of-kin of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 victims should move forward to officially give leverage or leeway to other independent organisations or parties to continue the search for the missing aircraft.

Universiti Kuala Lumpur (UniKL) test pilot Prof Dr Mohd Harridon Mohamed Suffian said other parties such as academia or experts which have international, vast or scant resources and methodological means to perform analysis and plausibly, could give different outcomes on the incident of the Boeing 777-200ER aircraft.

These differences are actually positive in nature as this would give us different or untried approach to search for the wreckage where this is perhaps an out of the box solution, he told Bernama yesterday.

Three days ago, chief investigator of the team investigating the safety aspects of MH370 Kok Soo Chon was reported to have said that the team was unable to determine the real cause for the disappearance of the ill-fated flight after identifying seven plausible theories which included conspiracy theory, rumours and gossip on social media.

Kok also said the 449-page report by Malaysian International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Annex 13 Safety Investigation Team was not a final report on the search for the missing aircraft, but was only on the safety investigation.

Last May, Malaysian Prime Minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad said that the time had come for Malaysia to stop the search after a three-month search carried out by an America-based firm officially ended without making major progress.

Mohd Harridon said the mystery of MH370 had instigated a lot of interests, particularly independent parties that vie to solve it.

For example, an organisation called Shipwreck Explorer has made it their livelihood to scour the ocean for missing ships or wreckages using independent resources and we should welcome this initiative as this is a positive tone to aid the recovery of MH370, he added.

Touching on the report, Mohd Harridon said it was examplary in terms of identifying certain deficiencies that existed within the aviation ecosystem and these identifications would be a good avenue for industry players to work upon in the spirit of alleviating the safety in aviation.

He pointed out that, even if the data of the final portion of the flight was unearthed or was available, there was a possibility that the root cause of the incident would not be known since many other factors would come into play.

It’s perhaps imperative to find the motive or the intention of the incident, he said, adding that the report which was published contained a very discreet analysis and technicalities of the event that transpired, where the jetliner went missing without a definite location of its final resting place.

Meanwhile, a lecturer in aerospace engineering at Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM) Associate Professor Dr Kamarul Arifin Ahmad said the investigating team had done its best during the past four years, despite not giving an ending as awaited by the next-of kin.

My opinion is that, indeed it cannot be detected the cause because there are many reasons and one of them is the absence of the black box. With the absence of other leading evidence, it is difficult for the investigating team to make any concrete conclusion, he said.

A former investigating officer with Royal Malaysian Air Force (RMAF), Captain Abdul Rahmat Omar Tun Mohd Haniff said the next -of-kin of passengers in MH370 should accept the fact that the aircraft was flown manually.

Why the aircraft was flown in that condition may not be known so soon, or even during our lifetime. (But) For certain, somebody flew it.

The next-of kin should accept that fact because we have no physical evidence of the aircraft, except for floating debris. Even if we found the aircraft, how are we to ascertain the motive, he added.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 went missing on March 8, 2014 while enroute from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The Boeing 777-200ER aircraft was carrying 12 crew and 227 passengers, mostly Chinese nationals.

Source: NAM News Network